About

‘Twistification’ is a word Thomas Jefferson famously used to characterize Justice John Marshall’s shifting of the focus of a case to the constitutionality of the underlying law. I found Jefferson’ s term amusing and as good as any to name a blog about the American Revolution.

I have a passion for the stories of the Founding Fathers and the American Revolution. Each book I pick up provides new insights into the lives of men and women living in one of the most remarkable periods in human history.

This blog provides a vehicle to share my passion for the period and spare my friends and loved ones the pains of feigning interest while I ramble on about Jefferson’s “minuet with duplicity” (as Ellis calls it), or Daniel Morgan’s effective use of militia during the battle of Cowpens.

I hope you enjoy my tidbits and twistifications. A quick warning, this is a political blog. I sometimes talk about he politics of late 18th century America. I haven’t quite caught up with the politics of the 19th, 20th and 21st just yet. Wait around for 50 years or so and I might get to that. Until then, if you see anyone affiliated with the Tea party, can you tell them that their contract to co-opt all things Revolutionary war has expired.

Thanks.

Peter

8 thoughts on “About”

  1. Mike Schellhammer said:

    This is a great site: well-organized, thoughful, and well-written. I’ll be on here regularly!

  2. Thanks for your research, hard work and love of the subject matter. I often wonder why the Revolution, Declaration of Independence and Constitution, and all aspects surrounding their existence aren’t more aggressively taught in schools. Each of those experiences teach us more about this country, the good, bad and the ugly, than modern day curricula can offer.

  3. Bryant Denny said:

    Great blog. I’ll be stopping back by.

    Have a good day,

    BD

  4. I very much enjoyed your blog, Twistification. I am working on a historybook-blog of my own, which can be seen at [one word] theoryofirony.com, then clicking on either the “sample chapter” or “blog” buttons at the top. My Rube Goldberg brain asks with an odd, well-caffeinated kind of logic: Why is there an inverse proportion between the size of the print and the importance of the message? Science. Commerce. Art. Literature. Military. Religion. I call this eccentric thinking the Theory of Irony and if your busy schedule permits, give a read, leave a comment or create a blogroll link. In any event, best of luck with your own endeavors.

    P.S. It concerns Classical, Medieval and Modern eras.

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